Workshop

W-13 / Seki Method

Minako Seki

In the frame of Winter Tanz 2017/18

... flow, swirl, tear, swarm, soothe, quietness, drop, rain, thunder, flash, patter, clear, moist air, wash, cleanse, heal, swim, dive, hover, ... In his book "The Sensitive Chaos" (1962) the water researcher Theodor Schwenk showed the analogy between the vital water formations and life. The structure of water is constantly moving and developing, as the human beings do. But it has other sides: the violence of water, the furrowing sea - agitated, dangerous, flooding and destroying -, or the absence of rain, water drowning and thirst, the pollution of the seas. Water can be observed from far away, but also from very close. The single drop, the small trickle, the puddle on the road, the water molecules. And then the fascinating underwater world.

In this winter’s workshop Minako Seki will deal with the materiality of water, with the understanding that the human body, with its approximately 80% water content, resembles a water bag. By observing the fluid, we will observe ourselves: our body and movement and also our deep inwardness. The Seki Method investigates the communication between the conscious and subconscious, the description of emotional states and the boundaries between reality and illusion.

Minako Seki, Nagasaki/Berlin. Dancer, choreographer, director, lecturer. Founder of Minako Seki Company and co-director of Berlin Post School for Physical Theater-Dance, 3rd generation Butoh dancer; guest lecturer at Justus-Liebig-Universität (Gießen), Folkwang University (Essen) and University of Hamburg. Various teaching calls and touring worldwide. 2017 she dance for Sol Pico Company (Barcelona) and Israel Galván (Sevilla). During the last twenty years Minako has refined her bodytechnique and teaching method, which is consolidated in the Seki Method. www.minakoseki.com

 

 

 

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Möckernstr. 68, 10965 Berlin

Level: Open
In English

Prices 100 € ( 85 € * )
* Early Bird Price: Applies on arrival of the full workshop fee on our account by 21.12.2017
Photo: Phillipp Freudigmann